Sending out a Global Virtual Hug

“I think life is always dangerous. Some people get afraid of it. Some people are afraid of it. Some people don’t go forward. But some people, if they want to achieve their goal, they have to go. They have to move…”  ~ Malala Yousafzai

It has been a week since the Women’s March, originally planned as a march on our nation’s capital the day after our presidential inauguration.  What began as a peaceful protest in Washington D.C. mushroomed out across our nation and spilled out onto all seven continents. It is now being called the largest demonstration in U.S. history, all done with zero arrests.

My husband and I marched in San Diego, CA and we are still reflecting back on the powerful emotions, images and the significance of that day.  The latest numbers I have read for “sister marches” show upwards of 673 marches across the globe, totaling 3.3 million people.  Never have I been more proud to be a woman.  Never have I felt more of a interconnectedness with all humans world-wide.

Whatever your motivation for marching, one thing is certain – this was our wake-up call.  No matter where we live we must stay informed and be an active participant in our life, no longer just an idle spectator as I have been prone to do in the past.  The rights that our ancestors fought so hard for are in jeopardy once again, not to mention the rights of Mother Earth, who we assault daily.  We must respectfully question lawmakers’ decisions and understand how those decisions affect our future and that of our loved ones.  We must live a life that honors all others and we must act against hatred and ignorance in our world.

At times I grow weary thinking about all the work ahead of us but then Gandhi’s words, “You must be the change you wish to see in the world”, echo in my head and I wonder how I can ever go back to being that girl I was before the march.  I do believe this much – our silence will not protect us.

I am overwhelmed by the outpouring of support by women and men across the globe.  So many of you know persecution well.  I honor your courage and am proud to have walked with you.

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NOTE:  All slideshow images courtesy of npr.com and nytimes.com.