Intro to Wolf Management & Ecology ~ Yellowstone Forever Field Seminar Series

After a few weeks of preparation, it was finally time to support my first field seminar, Intro to Wolf Management and Ecology.  Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone in 1995, debates relative to this alluring creature have been tireless and complex.  Wolf watchers in the park are enamored by them, ranchers and hunters not so much.

Sunrise at Slough Creek, site of an active wolf den.

I had heard several park employee discussions on the topic of reintroduction of the wolf, namely Doug Smith, project leader for the Wolf Restoration Project, since our arrival to the park.  He has studied wolves for the past 20+ years and still brings the same passion to the topic as he did as a Yellowstone freshman.  I was anxious to hear some fresh views on this subject from our class instructor, Jon Trapp.  Beyond  embracing many of the views presented by Doug, Jon also spoke on the topic of wolf denning, subject of his master’s thesis.

Our classroom time took us through the past couple of decades since reintroduction, how many of the wolves have been collared and tracked, the family dynamics of how they hunt together, and what happens when an alpha member of the pack is killed.  It was most informative and supporting this field seminar added another dimension to my time at the Buffalo Ranch.

Field time at the Slough Creek den

Wolves get a bad rap, some of it deserved, as they do kill some livestock.  No rancher wants to work hard to grow their herd, only to have a predator take from him.  The good news is that when this happens, the rancher is compensated for his loss.

Hunters who share the sentiment that the only good wolf is a dead wolf feel that the elk population has been jeopardized by the reintroduction of the wolf.  It is true that the mainstay of the Yellowstone wolf’s diet is elk; however, statistics have shown that many more elk are taken down by cougars than wolves.  I learned that 85-95% of the time when hunting an elk, the wolf is not successful, and their elk hunting is compensatory, killing weaker elk who were most likely going to die anyway.

Instructor Jon Trapp balanced over an abandoned wolf den

Our field studies were the most exciting, taking us to an area of the park where we could view an active wolf den using spotting scopes.  Watching the pups emerge from the den, tumbling over one another, frolicking in the sunlight, delighted us all.  Jon also took us to one of the first acclimation pens, Rose Creek, where we read the story of the first alpha female to the reintroduced to the park.  On another outing we inspected an abandoned wolf den.

With the wolf’s return to the world’s first national park, Yellowstone has regained its balance of historic mammals and is now described as the largest intact ecosystem in the temperate world.  We now see this region as it was before the Europeans arrived.

Biologists and scientists spend significant time in the field tracking the wolves of Yellowstone, but in the end what matters most is that we carved out another little piece of wildness with their reintroduction.  We need these wild spaces, their coarseness, erratic ebbs and flows, the magic and mystery.

Photo of the white wolf from September 2010, recently shot and killed within Yellowstone NP.

Disclaimer:  The views expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent the views of Yellowstone Forever.  

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A Yellowstone Forever Summer

Planning for our summer began in earnest several months ago but we just arrived at our destination, Yellowstone National Park, a few weeks ago and what a whirlwind it has been.

Giving back by way of volunteering is a passion of ours and this year we have elected (and been chosen) to be program volunteers for Yellowstone Forever.  Formerly known as Yellowstone Association, a merger in October 2016 between the Association and the Yellowstone Park Foundation created Yellowstone Forever, the educational and philanthropic partner of the park.  We will be supporting the naturalists who conduct the Field Seminars and soaking up every bit of knowledge we can along the way.  Their subject list is diverse, ranging from wildlife, birding, photography, geology, sketching, hiking, Native American studies, backpacking, fly-fishing, and an entire new Naturalist Series.  It is going to be an active and educational summer, one in which we feel fortunate to participate.

Training for our Yellowstone summer adventure spanned a couple of weeks and covered a broad spectrum of activities; e.g. orientation, bus driver training, an intensive two-day wilderness first aid class, course preparation, and camp duty…whew!

When we finally arrived at our summer home, the Lamar Buffalo Ranch, we hit the ground running with a dedicated group who travel from near and far to ready the campus for the upcoming summer season.  From top to bottom we scrubbed and scoured the bunk house, bath houses, and cabins, in anticipation of a busy summer.  If it sounds like a lot of prep, it is, but the care taken by Yellowstone Forever to ensure happy field seminar participants has resulted in numerous returnees year after year to consume the knowledge eagerly shared by the engaging naturalists who conduct the classes.

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Yes, it has been a whirlwind few weeks, tiring yet exhilarating.  Although far from being expert program volunteers, we both have one field seminar under our belts, “Intro to Wolf Management and Ecology” and “Bears, Bones, Signs, and Stories”.

As I sit on the back porch of our bunkhouse looking out over the heart of the Lamar Valley, known as the “Serengeti of North America”, I listen to the resounding thunder rolling across the landscape. Countless bison can be seen grazing, while their young “red dog” calves frolic.  I am humbled by the wonder of this magical landscape. I have no doubt that my Yellowstone Forever summer will change me in ways I cannot foresee.

Rumi said:

“There is a voice that doesn’t use words.  Listen.”

I believe that voice can be found in the wilderness, in places like Yellowstone National Park.  I plan to spend plenty of time listening.  As time and the internet permits, I hope to share what I have learned.

Hope you are all having a great start to your summer!

Disclaimer:  The views expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent the views of Yellowstone Forever.  

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A Disquieting Hiatus

A hiatus from my blog was never part of my vision, but neither did I contemplate how I would feel after the November 8th national election. Looking back at that fateful day, once the shock wore off, I easily slipped into activist mode, forsaking my blog, as writing at that time meant scripting my fears.  It seemed less painful to hold my breath, maintain a controlled distress.  I had seen so many on both sides of the aisle succumb to scorching criticism from those in their social circles, leaving bruised feelings in their wake.

Yes, we are in a very polarizing time in our history, one which leaves me weary as I swim through a deep well of sadness.  I feel the need to stay informed on pressing matters in our country and the world as I, like so many, have had my complacency exposed.  I can no longer go back to that idyllic ‘ignorance is bliss’ time in my life but my need for some semblance of harmony is acute.  So, how to balance this newfound discovery?  That is the question that echoes through the hallways of my mind.

Regular exercise, visits from friends, and meditation have all been cornerstones for me these past few months and I am grateful for them all.  Thankfully consuming large amounts of alcohol didn’t become part of my daily routine, although it may have had the coveted numbing effect.  Nothing fills up those empty spaces for me more than connecting with the natural world, filling that wild spot that resides in my soul.  I yearn for the muted ebb and flow of nature’s rhythms, far removed from the harsh reality of our everyday lives, where the frequent reminder that many of us have forgotten our connectedness to each other is too commonplace.

We have departed once again for our summer adventures.  I feel lighter already as I look ahead to the  uninterrupted breathing space that I always find in wilderness.  We will be spending our summer in Yellowstone National Park volunteering as program assistants for Yellowstone Forever, fka Yellowstone Association.  Reconnecting with friends and supporting the naturalists who conduct field seminars should make for a stimulating summer.  As internet allows, I will share some of our exploits.  Stay tuned!

“There is a candle in your heart, ready to be kindled.  There is a void in your soul, ready to be filled. You feel it, don’t you?”  ~  Rumi

Sending out a Global Virtual Hug

“I think life is always dangerous. Some people get afraid of it. Some people are afraid of it. Some people don’t go forward. But some people, if they want to achieve their goal, they have to go. They have to move…”  ~ Malala Yousafzai

It has been a week since the Women’s March, originally planned as a march on our nation’s capital the day after our presidential inauguration.  What began as a peaceful protest in Washington D.C. mushroomed out across our nation and spilled out onto all seven continents. It is now being called the largest demonstration in U.S. history, all done with zero arrests.

My husband and I marched in San Diego, CA and we are still reflecting back on the powerful emotions, images and the significance of that day.  The latest numbers I have read for “sister marches” show upwards of 673 marches across the globe, totaling 3.3 million people.  Never have I been more proud to be a woman.  Never have I felt more of a interconnectedness with all humans world-wide.

Whatever your motivation for marching, one thing is certain – this was our wake-up call.  No matter where we live we must stay informed and be an active participant in our life, no longer just an idle spectator as I have been prone to do in the past.  The rights that our ancestors fought so hard for are in jeopardy once again, not to mention the rights of Mother Earth, who we assault daily.  We must respectfully question lawmakers’ decisions and understand how those decisions affect our future and that of our loved ones.  We must live a life that honors all others and we must act against hatred and ignorance in our world.

At times I grow weary thinking about all the work ahead of us but then Gandhi’s words, “You must be the change you wish to see in the world”, echo in my head and I wonder how I can ever go back to being that girl I was before the march.  I do believe this much – our silence will not protect us.

I am overwhelmed by the outpouring of support by women and men across the globe.  So many of you know persecution well.  I honor your courage and am proud to have walked with you.

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NOTE:  All slideshow images courtesy of npr.com and nytimes.com.  

The Long Sad Farewell

It seems I just stepped back into the blogging world and already I am taking a hiatus…not planned, just other thoughts and activities have swirled around me lately.  Since my aha moment several weeks ago that I haven’t done enough to further causes I believe in, I decided to change all that.  Staying informed and researching volunteer opportunities is what has occupied my time.

I recently watched a program highlighting Barack Obama’s presidency and was reminded again of all that he accomplished for us, the American people, while under constant scrutiny and resistance from so many in Congress, whose main goal was to thwart anything he wanted to accomplish.  And tomorrow this man of unwavering courage and compassion, President Obama, will step away from public office and a new regime takes the helm, one so much different from him that it is difficult to wrap my head around.  But this post isn’t about my anxiety or fear for our future, and there is much, but rather a heartfelt farewell to a leader whom I will miss terribly.

So to you, President Obama, here are a few of my thoughts:

My heart is heavy as I write this.  I cannot believe that your eight years as the leader of our country is drawing to a close.  In many ways it has sped by, but at times for you and your family it must have felt like an eternity.

As a white woman I see that there has been some progress made on the racial divide in this country but at times when you faced obstacles moving issues forward, I wondered and suspected that the racial divide played a role, and for that I am deeply embarrassed.  Even so, these impediments seemed only to propel you forward more urgently, always with the vision of making our lives better.

I believe so many of us sensed, from that moment as we watched 1.8 million people lined up on a frigid January day along the National Mall, anxiously awaiting the inauguration of our 44th President, that this was a ground-breaking moment that we would forever look back upon with reverence, and I will.

Your speeches, always charged with emotion, so powerful, so eloquent, gave me hope.  You were not afraid to show your vulnerability, particularly after tragic events in our country.

The Sandy Hook tragedy, when so many young, innocent children lost their lives, seemed a weight almost too great for you to bear, yet you stood before us, tears wetting your face, bolstering us.  When you stood at the podium and sang “Amazing Grace” after the Charleston church shooting, your grace and compassion shone through above all else.  These are images I will forever carry.  During these moments I felt we had a glimpse into your soul, the incredible man that you are.

Your vision has always been one of unity and the intense desire to ease our burdens.  You know far better than any of us that your work is far from over, so it is now incumbent upon us to keep your vision alive.

When John Lewis, civil-rights icon, recently spoke about you, he said you “never gave up, never gave in…and kept moving ahead”.  Now it is up to us to carry that torch.

Farewell to you President Obama, and your lovely, courageous First Lady and family.  We will miss you terribly and we will be forever grateful for having you as our leader these past eight years.

Yes you did, and yes, we can.

Note:  All photos in this post courtesy of google search.